Southern Animals

Information about the animals and critters of the Atricis Area, as well as other creatures of Pern.

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Re: Southern Animals

Postby Karkeloth » Mon Mar 30, 2015 2:53 am

Treestalkers

Name(s): Treestalkers, sometimes simply called Stalkers.

Habitat: They are found strictly in forested areas and jungles. Treestalkers don't appear to really wander outside of their forests. In the wild, they rarely reuse the same sleeping sites, and also spend much of their lives in trees. However, their numbers in their respective forests do tend to remain small, making them a more uncommon, to rare creature.

Diet: Treestalkers are carnivores, and will eat small to medium sized prey both in the trees and on the ground.

Habits: Treestalkers are known as cathemeral, meaning they are active both the day and night, giving them very little obvious pattern to their sleep habits. They actively hunt both day and night, and while they spend most of their time climbing and jumping through trees, they will come down to hunt ground prey. Outside of mating, Treestalkers are a more docile creature despite their carnivorous behaviors, though males can sometimes try to bite more often than females might.

Appearance: Fossa look something like a diminutive southern feline, however, they lack the signature spots souther felines sport, and have a long slender body and muscular limbs. Their tails are nearly as long as their bodies, and their heads appear somewhat small with small, rounded ears. Their fur comes in a range of muted browns and slight grey tones, with very little marking other than lighter underbellies.

Based off Fossa

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Re: Southern Animals

Postby Karkeloth » Mon Mar 30, 2015 2:53 am

Dune Kits

Name(s): Dune Kits

Habitat: Dune kits prefer desert habitats the most, but can be found sometimes in dry/hot prairies and savanna regions. It's rare for them to wander outside of those regions, though they might wander into grasslands, but only temporarily, always returning to their preferred, dry regions to live.

Diet: Dune kits are omnivores, and find their food sources in plants, insects, small mammals, and even eggs. For a healthy diet, it is best to feed them a combination of these things, rather than just sticking to one of them for every meal.

Habits:

Appearance:

Based off Fennec Foxes

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Re: Southern Animals

Postby Karkeloth » Mon Mar 30, 2015 2:53 am

Mini Gliders

Name(s):Mini Gliders – Their name comes from their diminutive size and ability to glide in the air.

Habitat: Mini Gliders will live in any area of the South that is heavily forested and mostly warm. Though they prefer slightly drier climates, they can be found in the more humid jungles as well as the less humid forests. They are found mostly in the northern half of the Southern Continent, rarely venturing to the cooler southern end due to a sensitivity to cold. As one might expect, they are arboreal and spent most of their lives in trees.

Diet: These little guys are opportunistic feeders, meaning they will eat just about anything. In warmer months their diet consists dominantly of insects, but in months where insects are lesser, they feed mostly on tree sap and plant nectar. They will sometimes feed on live prey, but due to heir small size, this is limited to the smaller prey. They will also eat fruit, eggs, fungi, and just about anything edible really.

Habits: Like a lot of the Southern fauna, Mini Gliders are dominantly nocturnal, sleeping in nests during the day and hunting at night. They also live in small family groups that consist of anywhere from 3 to 7 adults and the current young that will usually leave the group once they are grown. Because they tend to be prey to the larger fauna of Pern a lot of the time, Mini Gliders, while highly social with their family groups, are skittish and tend to flee quickly.

Appearance: Mini Gliders resemble Branchcats in some ways, especially at first glance, but closer inspection shows them to be different. For one, Mini Gliders actually lack the full six limbs that most Pern fauna sports. Mini Gliders only have four limbs, however, they do sport a thing fleshy membrane between their front and back limbs. This membrane can be stretched between their limbs and allows the creatures to glide from tree to tree, giving them their name. They sport long tails and small slightly pointed ears and a pointed face with a small nose and large eyes. Normally, they come in grey on the top and white on their underbellies, with striping markings adorning their heads. On rare occasion they can come in white, and even more rarely, black, though these colors might possibly be cases of albinism and melanism, explaining their rarity.

Design based off sugar gliders

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Re: Southern Animals

Postby Karkeloth » Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:25 pm

Image

SHELL-WHALES



General Appearance

Shell-whales are marine based creatures that travel in large, extended families called pods much like with the smaller Shipfish that are sometimes found traveling alongside them. They get their name from the hard shell on their back, which is a sturdy dermal plating that transitions to a thick hide and blubber on the rest of the body. Generally, Shell-whales can be found in shades of gray, with white and black being the rare extremes of the spectrum. It is not abnormal for them to have tinges of blue, green, or even purple, especially on their shells, but color does not seem to denote any sort of rank. They have small eyes, a blunt face, and a large, bulbous forehead where the sound waves they produce can be amplified and used for echolocation. These creatures have a set of long pectoral fins which help them move through the water at surprisingly fast speeds despite their size, as well as a smaller set of fins further down their body, and a tail that tapers to a strong fluke.


Habits and Diet

They are led by a Matriarch, who is the oldest living female in the group, and are often in tune with the magnetic fields within their environment. Every couple of turns, the pods travel back to the warmer, inner coastal waters where they were born to give birth to new calves, and will travel to these locations even if it the journey is dangerous, or if there are new obstacles in their way. Because of this, it is believed that they are not very intelligent, although there is some debate about whether or not they continue due to a lack of understanding, or if there is some other factor for why they do not veer their course. They have a tight-knit community structure as well as a variety of verbal and non-verbal communication methods despite this, and usually Shell-whales are most notorious for trouble either when separated from their pod, distracted out of curiosity, or when they happen to ignore danger because they are traveling back to their birthing grounds.

The majority of the time, however, they are deep and open sea dwellers that travel long distances every day in search of food. Surprisingly, these creatures eat a mixture of smaller marine life and vegetation whenever they can find it in an omnivorous diet, and are more akin to scavengers or foragers than predatory hunters. They will not track down a source of food to kill it per say, but they do travel large distances in search of new feeding grounds, and it is thought that they may cycle through known areas rather than wander around aimlessly. Due to the layers of blubber, they are able to also survive in colder climates, and it is believed that there may be variations of other Shell-whales closer to the poles where weather becomes the most harsh. Regardless, it is not known exactly how far they will travel, and it will take time to track the movements of pods to determine how many are actually in the wild today.


Mating and Offspring

During mating season, males often compete for mates in physical displays as well as fighting among one another. Sometimes these battles can get rather violent — one of the few times Shell-whales will ever get aggressive other than when they are defending their young is during these displays — it is not uncommon to see older individuals with scarring because of past injuries, and it may be thought that a "battle-scarred" male is preferred for their experience over one who is not. Shell-whales do not take mates permanently, however, and both males and females become sexually mature at three turns of age. The gestation period may take up to two turns before a mother gives live birth to usually one, or occasionally two calves. Females will not mate again until their calf is full grown, or unless it dies, however, if a mother loses her calf early it is not uncommon for them to try and steal another female’s young. Despite this, the pod helps to raise the calves as a whole, and if a predator approaches them, the adults will often circle around the juveniles to protect them.

~ Created by Honeywish

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Re: Southern Animals

Postby Karkeloth » Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:43 pm

Flutterstab or Fluttersting


Habitat:
While female workers are seen continually flitting about the entire continent, the actual hives are nestled within the elder trees deep in the hearts of woodlands and jungles. The latter is their more common home.

Diet:
Flutterstabs feast upon nectar, though it is not unheard of for them to consume the juices of other bugs. Larvae are fed a mix of nectar and chemicals secreted from worker males.

Flutterstabs will feed each other by vomiting the nectar from their beaks onto the tongues of another. Each transition from flutter to flutter allows enzymes to break the foodstuff down into a complex concoction, which is then stored within the hive as backup food and sealed for safety with wax. Chemicals from the stored sweetness are absorbed into the hivetree's bark, hardening the surface into something that is largely Thread-resistant. What remains from the transformed nectar is a sticky, sweet resin dubbed 'sugargum'.

Habits:
Flutterstabs function with a hivemind mentality. Their primary drives are to bring nectar to the home, feed the larvae, and protect the Queen.

'Worker' flutters tend to the collecting of food. They are female Flutterstabs that lack the ability to reproduce (thanks largely to the chemicals injected into their foodstuff early in life). These workers go from flower to flower, collecting sweet nectar. They are known to fly for thousands of miles in a single day, crossing the wide expanse of the continent and returning home once their mission is completed. Pollen collects on their fur from each visit. Worker flutters are almost singlehandedly responsible for the pollination of the world's fuana.

Male 'drones' tend to the home. Their duty is to protect the young/food/Queen while maintaining the hive's construction. Drones excrete a fibrous material that is used to fix damage components and create new ones. They are not armed with stingers, but can set a pheromone-laced 'alarm' that will trigger a defensive response from the workers.

There is only one Queen of the hive, the sole female that is allowed to reproduce. Male suitors from other hives will enter her home during mating season (the beginning of spring). Thousands will breed with her, and she will store their sperm for use throughout the year. The Queen does not leave her 'chamber', constantly birthing eggs that are carried off by drones to their cells.

A single Queen is laid three times a year. When the Queen larvae mature, they will dispatch to an elder tree with several workers and drones to begin a new colony.

While Southern flutterstings are not nearly as aggressive are their Northern counterparts, they will act quickly upon any threats to the hive. Their stingers remain intact after attacking, allowing them to inflict multiple wounds without tiring. Each sting contains 50% Mellitin, which destroys blood cells by breaking up their membranes and activating a histamine release in the victim's body. Those allergic, or who are subject to many stings, will undergo an anaphylactic response that causes blood pressure to increase and bronchioles to constrict, leading to eventual swelling of the airway.

Trained flutterstingkeepers will 'smoke' a tree before attempting to collect sugargum. This will put the flutterstings in a brief catatonic state. While there has been some study about using pheromones to interact with a hive without the danger of being stung, this has yet to be enacted.

A single hive contains about 80,000 flutterstings, with larger trees containing even more. It is not uncommon for multiple hives to reside within a ten foot square range, as they are rather docile with one another.

Appearance:
Flutterstings are roughly an inch long. Their heads resemble that of a bird's, with puny black eyes and long beaks equally the length of their bodies. Through the beak is a long tongue that can dip into the finer depths of a flower. Four wings extend from their backs, giving the 'flutter' to their name due to their rapid, unwavering beating.

Their upper halves, including the wings, are coated with a fine fur-like lining, bright neon green in hue. The thorax, however, is covered with a tough, bright red exoskeleton. These colors are thought to ward off predators with the threat of a painful, poisonous sting. At the tip of their thoraxes (and for workers only) are tiny, sharp stingers that extend only when threatened.

Unlike most insects, these creatures only have four frail-looking black legs.

Queen flutterstings have bright colorful crests atop their heads. Their wings are small and weak, shriveling after mating and preventing them from flying. Their thoraxes are typically inflated with the culmination of eggs. Queens are easily three times the size of a worker fluttersting.

A little thing about sugargum: This sweet, sticky concoction is typically harvested and sold as is. It can be consumed by any human, and is thought to have medicinal benefits. The substance itself is highly acidic to microorganisms, giving it an incredibly long shelf-life.With the addition of water and yeast, sugargum can also be fermented into a sweet, alcoholic beverage.

The sugargum's flavor varies on the flowers the flutterstabs feed from, but it is nigh-impossible to restrict their diet to any one species of plant.

Based off of honeybees and hummingbirds.


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